STAND 2016

The Weekly Review /  Read article

The Weekly Review /  Read article


Featuring 'After Midnight' 2015 sculpture. Styled by Marsha Golemac and photo by Brooke Holm for Robson Rak Architects.

Featuring 'After Midnight' 2015 sculpture. Styled by Marsha Golemac and photo by Brooke Holm for Robson Rak Architects.


"Highly stylish and naive is a good way of summarising these fantastic sculptures and drawings by Australian Artist Peter Cole. This ‘child’s view’ has been seen in many artist’s work over the years, one that comes to mind when looking at Peter’s work is Alexander Calder." - Mark Robinson OEN / Read article

"Highly stylish and naive is a good way of summarising these fantastic sculptures and drawings by Australian Artist Peter Cole. This ‘child’s view’ has been seen in many artist’s work over the years, one that comes to mind when looking at Peter’s work is Alexander Calder." - Mark Robinson

OEN / Read article


Works Available / Sulptures

Works Available / Sulptures


Sight Unseen / Read Article

Sight Unseen / Read Article


Looking from living area through to study.  Work on paper (left) and small sculptures on table all by Peter D Cole.  Embryo chair by Mark Newson.  French provincial 19th Century painted vitrine. Photo - Sean Fennessy, production – Lucy Feagins / The Design Files.

Living room. Timber sculpture at left – ‘Impossible Alliance’ , 1979 by Peter D Cole.  Large sculpture with books – ‘Information’ , 2009 by Peter D Cole.  Wicker chair by Marc Newson.  Photo - Sean Fennessy, production – Lucy Feagins / The Design Files.

Living room. Timber sculpture at left – ‘Impossible Alliance’ , 1979 by Peter D Cole.  Large sculpture with books – ‘Information’ , 2009 by Peter D Cole.  Wicker chair by Marc Newson.  Photo - Sean Fennessy, production – Lucy Feagins / The Design Files.


Peter D Cole was born in Gawler SA, moved to Adelaide and studied Sculpture at the South Australian School of Art where he was awarded the H.P. Gill Medal in 1968. Since the 1970’s Cole has been based in Kyneton, Victoria, where he has established himself as one of Australia’s senior and most renowned contemporary sculptors. Cole has largely lived and worked in rural areas of Australia, drawing on the landscape as a source of inspiration and recent research trips to Japan and India have added to his rich source material. 

As public artist, Cole has made a significant contribution to the urban landscape and public spaces of Australia receiving the Australian National Trust Heritage Award and the Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture Award of Merit for Foundation Park, a permanent work at The Rocks, Sydney. He is highly sought for commissions and his work is prominent in many public and corporate collections throughout Australia, including Parliament House, Canberra, the National Gallery of Australia, and Brisbane International Airport.

Jessica Bridgefoot,  2014


Cole views the Australian landscape through the eyes of a civilised, urban man who knows his art history. He may live in the country… but he puts nature on a stage to be viewed by a well-read, sophisticated audience.
— Ken Scarlett, Civilising the Bush, Sculpture Magazine, 1999